A separation agreement can be registered with the family court as a « consent decision ». This means that if something goes wrong, it can be enforced as a court order. Learn more about resolving disputes about how you want to take care of your children trials will inevitably be fierce. There are many more chances to keep your future relationship friendly (and agree on a separation that is suitable for both parties, keep mutual friends, and facilitate access to the children) if you can work out the details of the separation together before you reach court. An act of separation can make the divorce process easier, faster and less stressful, as many difficult things have already been agreed. If your relationship breaks down, you will have the opportunity to work with your former partner. This is called a separation agreement. If you cannot or cannot accept separation, if you have separated from your former partner, you can apply to the family court for a separation order. If the separation of the relationship has already occurred in some way in family court – for example, if you have applied for an education order for daily custody of the children – the court will encourage you and your spouse or partner to consult to try to reach an agreement on important issues. Decisions made can be formalized in a separation agreement. A separation agreement is the best option for most people who have children or property together. You can conclude the agreement yourself, in writing or orally (it must be in writing if it contains information about your common property). If you are able to prove that the agreement worked well for a certain period of time, a judge could use it as a basis for a consent referral during the divorce proceedings.

A separation agreement can deal with issues such as: This template provides that you can set your specific arrangements for your children. Although you are not binding on the Court of Justice, your joint agreement will reduce the risk of future disagreements, as well as all other aspects of your life. . . .